Hi, my name is Timo Ernst and I am a web expert.

Posts Tagged ‘Google’

Rumor: Google bundles Chrome with Flash?

Posted on: March 30th, 2010 by Timo

It’s just a rumor, but it’s being said that there are plans out there that Google will release future versions of Chrome with Flash bundled.

If it’s true, this fact would be really astonishing for me, since Google usually tries to push open-source technologies, which Flash definately isn’t. Further, GWT is a direct rival of the Adobe Flex platform, so it really doesn’t marke sense why Google should increase its support in Flash.

Thus, I can’t believe that this rumor is true, but if it is, it would make me a really happy man :-)

My vision: Get Flash preinstalled on ChromeOS and Android! yay! :-)

Update: It’s true! An official statement confirms the partnership between Adobe and Google by integrating the Flash Player into Chrome:

Paul Betlem (Adobe): Today, Google is releasing the initial integration of Flash Player with Chrome in their developer channel (behind a command line flag). Moving forward, Google will be including Flash Player in Chrome so users will always have the most current release and a safer and more seamless experience. The robust integration between Chrome and Flash Player will serve as a showcase for more consistent, seamless, and efficient Web browsing experiences. We feel that this significant effort by both Google and Adobe will directly improve the speed of innovation and move the Web forward, benefiting the entire community of developers and end-users.

The Chromium authors blogged about the benefits, which are:

  • When users download Chrome, they will also receive the latest version of Adobe Flash Player. There will be no need to install Flash Player separately.
  • Users will automatically receive updates related to Flash Player using Google Chrome’s auto-update mechanism. This eliminates the need to manually download separate updates and reduces the security risk of using outdated versions.
  • With Adobe’s help, we plan to further protect users by extending Chrome’s “sandbox” to web pages with Flash content.
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Switching to Google Chrome

Posted on: March 2nd, 2010 by Timo

I changed my default browser from Safari to Chrome.

Why?

All the downsides I mentioned some weeks ago have been fixed by Google which makes Chrome the best browser out there so far (For me at least).
Privacy issues seem to have gone since Chrome cannot be identified through a unique ID anymore. Further, using my self-written RSS-reader plugin Fruit-RSS, there is nothing left that could force me to stay with Safari.

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Google Chrome’s real purpose

Posted on: December 21st, 2009 by Timo

I thought Chrome was made for rendering HTML. Seems like, I was wrong.
This is what happened to me some minutes ago:

Chrome cannot render HTML
English translation: The document “test.html” could not be opened. Chrome cannot open “HTML document” type files.

Nice.

This happens if I try to drag a HTML document from my desktop onto the Chrome icon on my dick dock.
If I now press CMD+O and select the same file, Chrome renders the page wonderfully.

I hope this gets fixed in the final release. Using the 4.0.249.43 Beta for Mac OS X here.

Update: I just tried again with another HTML file. Worked. Tried again with the same file. Fail. What the heck?

Update II : I just tried to undo a typo in the WordPress 2.9 WYSIWYG editor in Google Chrome. Doesn’t work. Jeez…

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Google Chrome on my Mac

Posted on: December 8th, 2009 by Timo

Today, Google finally released a beta version of their browser Chrome for MacOS X.

Although I really don’t like the way Chrome gathers data while I surf the web, the browser’s actually not that bad.

Damn, it’s FAST!
When fireing the browser up for the first time, you’ll think that the browser has already been pre-loaded into the Mac’s RAM, but that’s not the case. It starts up as fast as an already loaded Safari and leaves Firefox far far behind.

The best of two worlds
Something that I really missed on Safari is a possibility to easily install addons. Chrome isn’t that comfortable like Firefox with its build-in addon installation feature but you can browse through some Chrome extension websites, download an addon manually and install it with a doubleclick. Doesn’t work in the beta though :-(

A robust piece of software
Another useful feature is that Chrome starts every tab in its own process. I really could have used that today when I played around with some JavaScript functions that produced an infinite loop which caused Safari to crash multiple times and take all my other open tabs (Tutorials, Google search results…) down to its cold and dark grave. Really annoying. Chrome definately earns a plus here.

Less is more
But it’s not only the technical side of Chrome that I like. The browser integrates very well into the MacOS X look and feel. The title bar looks very “macish” and minimalistic. Each tab does not simply “pop-up”: It slides smoothly up and down, depending on if you open or close a tab. Very nice.

… BUT I WON’T USE IT !
Ok, so far you might think I switched my browser. But I didn’t. I am currently writing this post on Safari.
Why?
Chrome lacks three very important features that prevent me from “enjoying” it:

  1. No built-in rss-reader :-( . If you click a rss link, the only thing you’ll see is the XML markup behind it. Who on earth builds such a nice and modern browser without a rss reader? I don’t get it. Currently, there are only two ways to read your feeds: Either you setup Chrome to open Safari for you and display the feed there (How shitty is that?) or you install an extension that opens the feed in Google Reader. Both variants suck hard imho. Maybe I’ll have to build my own addon for some Safari-like feed handling. Oh, no wait. Installation of currently available extensions doesn’t work on Chrome for Mac. Awesome.
  2. Privacy. Privacy, privacy, PRIVACY! Do you know how much data Google collects when you surf the web? Only two examples although I could prolly continue this list forever:
    • If you search for something, using google.com and you’re logged in on your Google account (or use Google Chrome), you’re identifiable. This means, Google knows who you are and what you search for since technically you just send a couple of words to Google. Who said, they’d not save this data to their database? Did you really think they’d delete all the precious informations they gathered about you?
      If you search for “Best practices on assasinating Sergey Brin” and you apply for a Job at Google tomorrow, you can be sure not to get the job. I guess.
    • If you now browse a website about best assasinating techniques and the webmaster uses Google ads, you’re screwed. Adsense sets cookies that store your favourite (website-)topics on your computer. Google knows now that you visited i-kill-sergey.com. Not good.

    Ok, the thing is now that if you use Google Chrome, and you don’t turn off all the data-sniffing features like the DNS-caching service, one becomes a glassy human being. So my tip is: Turn that shit off:
    Chrome privacy setting

  3. Did I already mention that I neither can read my rss feeds nor can I install any extensions on Chrome for Mac? GRRAWGHGHHWHHWGH!!

Maybe these issues will be solved when the Chrome beta ends. Til then, I’ll stick to good old Safari.

If you want to know more, check out this Apple-wannabe video here from Google (hosted on Golem.de) for some “live” picture about Google Chrome:

One last thing: What’s really funny now is that almost all websites that offer plugins for Chrome are suddenly absolutely not or difficult available. Don’t tell me that only a minority is using this browser! Seems like Google is again cutting the grass here, like everything else they touch. Scary.

Please digg this article if you liked it.

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Flash + Chrome OS = ?

Posted on: November 30th, 2009 by Timo

I am a passionate RIA developer, especially if it comes up to using Adobe’s Flex SDK. It’s so easy to use and one can built great web applications in no time.
The best thing I always liked (and still do) is that everything comes “from one hand”. Which means, that the whole API is made by Adobe and most common use-cases are already build-in.
Ever tried to create a div box with rounded corners and shadows just with html and css? Good luck. Using the Flash Builder, it’s just two clicks and you’re done. In my opinion, this makes Flex a development environment which is very consistent and easy to handle, unlike pure JavaScript-solutions that often rely on multiple 3rd-party frameworks.

Since I started coding RIA applications, I was always wondering what would the future look like? Would Flash-based apps conquer the web or will JavaScript (with a little help from Google) be the next step for the evolution of the www?
To be honest, I haven’t really found an answer yet.

As good as Flex can be used to efficiently write rich internet applications, so bad is its reputation on “real” programmers like C/C++, Java developers and even Webengineers that completely focus on pure JavaScript solutions not only cause of Flash’s serious security issues. Adobe seems to have both hands busy with fixing security holes while only a minority of the internet users runs the updaters frequently enough to be safe from a wide range of potential attacks on the flash plugin.

However, the one big advantage of Flash, which would be fast and easy video playback, seems to be melting down since W3C’s announcement that html5 will support real movie embedding and playback. I can already foresee how Youtube will be completely flash-free one day.

So, what if it is not necessary anymore to use Flash to embed a little video snipped on your favourite website? What is the reason for web developers to decide for the Flex framework instead of trying a pure JavaScript solution?

Yesterday, something funny came to my mind. I was thinking about Java and how great it failed to reach the desktop while becoming the standard technology if it comes up to web backends.
I find it funny, if you compare Java and Flash. Both rely on an own virtual machine that makes applications written for these framworks always look and behave the same, no matter which operating system you use.
You could also compare Javascript with C/C++ pretty much the same way. If you want to code applications in C, you have to keep many platform-specific things in mind. It’s pretty much the same with JavaScript. If you finished developing your brand new killer website, noone’s gonna say that it will work well in the Internet Explorer 6, only cause you tested it in Firefox 3.5. Even other “w3c-compatible” browsers like Safari, Opera or Chrome might give you a headache as a webengineer. To avoid these problems, most people rely on frameworks like Dojo, GWT and/or jQuery but I’d lie if I said that these would guarantee a clean and fluent development of web applications without any problems. On top of this, one needs to learn how to handle these frameworks, which is very often a pain in the a**.

Since the release of the sourcecode of Google’s Chrome OS, I can finally see how web applications could start conquering over classic desktop applications and I’m really exited about it.

Just imagine, you’d had to write an app for Chrome OS, like let’s say an online graphic editor like Photoshop, but on the web. Why’d you choose Ajax over Flash? Remember that using the Flex framework will speed up the development process a lot since so many components already work out of the box like menu-bars, for instance.

I hope Flash will do better here than Java did in the desktop world and become the cross-platform development enviroment for Chrome OS but without the drawbacks of Java like a slow loading time and low application performance.

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